Unit testing embedded and Arduino projects

By dave on November 10, 2018

When you’ve got more than the simplest embedded program for Arduino (or any other framework), it becomes much harder to test that it’s working properly by purely running it. For something like Blink, testing is simple because all we need to do is upload it and see the LED turn on and off; there’s little risk of missing anything significant. However, let’s skip forward to a menu based application with Serial or Ethernet control, there is very little chance that you’d catch all the edge cases by manual testing.

Timed blink - IO Abstraction library example

By dave on October 20, 2017

Timed blink is a version of well known Arduino blink example that is shipped with the standard IDE, but is redesigned to use the Abstraction and timer library. Example circuit for the code is exactly the same a blink, and if you use the inbuilt LED pin (which it does by default) then there’s no need to build any circuit whatsoever. Instead of using delay() calls to set the duration of the led flash, it uses the task management library to schedule a task.

IOA I2C/Wire abstraction that works Across Arduino and mbed

By dave on May 21, 2021

IoAbstraction 2.0 onwards has core I2C/Wire functionality provided by several functions, these abstract the use of I2C over Arduino and mbed, and over time the implementation of these will be improved, such that asynchronous behaviour will be possible on certain boards. Prior to 2.0, we had conditional I2C code scattered around the project, but now nearly all such functionality is separated out by platform, and sometimes even by board, we’ve made this available through the API, so you can use it too.

Simple Collection - btree list

By dave on November 28, 2020

IoAbstraction contains a very simple collection that is relatively lightweight and works on a wide range of boards. It is a btree list that provides ordering and list storage. It works on anything from Arduino Uno upwards! It’s memory usage is very configurable, and the way it resizes arrays is also configurable too. You can set the initial size if you know how many items to expect, and do not wish for it to resize, or you can rely on platform defaults, for more general purpose cases.

Task Manager Low Power example for SAMD boards

By dave on September 25, 2019

There are often cases when you’ll need to run a micro controller from a battery power source. Unlike when running from mains power, every milli-amp matters. In these cases IoAbstraction’s task manager is able to integrate easily with most low power libraries. Task manager works by repeatedly calling the runLoop() function within loop() or main, during each loop task manager evaluates if any tasks are yet ready to run, and if they are it runs them.

Stabilising an existing Arduino or embedded product

By dave on November 18, 2018

Sometimes the situation arises where a product is built (or gets close to being built), before any concerns about it’s stability are discussed or proper planning arranged. Often this leads to code being written without any proper test plan in place. Combined with very tight deadlines there’s often even no plan to go back and fix things up. Once this situation occurs, it’s probable that the product release will be compromised.

Rotary encoder with non-polling (interrupt based) switches from PCF8574

By dave on August 24, 2018

IoAbstraction has full support for interrupts on most devices, meaning we can connect a Rotary Encoder to an Arduino using a standard PCF8574 IO expander chip. In order to do this we need the PCF8574 /INT line to be connected to an Arduino pin that supports interrupts (such as pins 2 or 3). Further, you can also have switches handle push button input without polling, by initialising for interrupt, especially useful with IO exapnders.

IoAbstraction: Using matrix keyboards and keypads

By dave on August 17, 2019

Matrix keyboards are arranged such that the keys are in a matrix of rows and columns. This means that instead of needing a spare input for each key, one INPUT for each column and one OUTPUT for each row is all that’s needed. In order to use the keyboard, we create a class of type MatrixKeyboardManager and configure it with an IoAbstractionRef, a KeyboardLayout that describes the keyboard attached (there are some standard ones already defined) and a listener that will be informed of changes.

Getting started Unit testing with Arduino platform

By dave on November 18, 2018

This article discusses how to unit test a simple project with Arduino, if you’re not used to writing unit tests, or need more background, then first read this guide on unit testing embedded projects. My favoured library for writing unit tests on Arduino platform is AUnit. It is open source, under a commercial friendly MIT license and provides a nice API. It is available from here: AUnit is available through library manager, just install it direct from the IDE.

Arduino Button presses that are handled like events

By dave on February 9, 2018

Have you ever wanted to treat button presses in Arduino similar to other languages, where you get an event callback when the switch is pressed? Look no further, the IO abstraction library can do that with very little fuss. In fact it can also do the same for rotary encoders as well, treating them similar to how scroll bars work in desktop applications. To start we need to get the IoAbstraction library and open the buttonRotartyEncoder example.

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